Paul Strand

Paul Strand

เกิดเมื่อ ๑๖ มกราคม ๑๘๙๐ ที่เมือง New York รัฐ New York

ตายเมื่อ ๓๑ มีนาคม ๑๙๗๖ ที่เมืองปารีส ประเทศฝรั่งเศส

Strand เป็นช่างภาพชาวอเมริกันที่เป็นหนึ่งในผู้ผลักดันภาพถ่ายให้เป็นหนึ่งในศิลปะชั้นสูงที่ผู้คนอเมริกันในสมัยนั้นยอมรับ [Wikipedia, แปลโดย Yai]

Strand attended Ethical Culture Fieldston School where he was a student of Lewis Wickes Hine – an American sociologist and photographer. Hine used his camera as a tool for social reform. Hine’s photographs were instrumental in changing the child labor laws in the United States. During that time, Strand’s first photographic influence came when he visited the 291 studio – run by Stieglitz anEdward Steichen. The studio would exhibit work by forward thinking painters and photographers.

In 1949 (at 59), he moved to France and remained there until his death. While in France, Strand was monitored by the security services for his political movements.

Self portrait.

Self portrait.

self-portrait (picture, title, year, story behind the picture, my opinion on the picture)

(my opinion on the picture)

Blind, 1916 Paul Strand (American, 1890–1976) Platinum print; 13 3/8 x 10 1/8 in. (34 x 25.7 cm) Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1933 (33.43.334) © 1997, Aperture Foundation Inc., Paul Strand Archive SEE COMPLETE RECORD . While he was in high school in New York City, Paul Strand studied photography with Lewis Hine, the social reformer and photographer. He also frequented Alfred Stieglitz's Little Galleries of the Photo-Secession—later known as "291" for its address on Fifth Avenue—where he quickly absorbed the lessons of modern European art through the work of Picasso, Brancusi, and Cézanne, among others. In 1916, Strand made a series of candid street portraits with a handheld camera fitted with a special prismatic lens, which allowed him to point the camera in one direction while taking the photograph at a ninety-degree angle. This seminal image of a street beggar was published in 1917 as a gravure in Stieglitz's magazine Camera Work and immediately became an icon of the new American photography, which integrated the objectivity of social documentation with the boldly simplified forms of modernism. [http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/33.43.334]

Blind, 1916 by Paul Strand (American, 1890–1976)
Platinum print; 13 3/8 x 10 1/8 in. (34 x 25.7 cm)
© 1997, Aperture Foundation Inc., Paul Strand Archive
While he was in high school in New York City, Paul Strand studied photography with Lewis Hine, the social reformer and photographer. He also frequented Alfred Stieglitz’s Little Galleries of the Photo-Secession—later known as “291” for its address on Fifth Avenue—where he quickly absorbed the lessons of modern European art through the work of Picasso, Brancusi, and Cézanne, among others. In 1916 (at 26), Strand made a series of candid street portraits with a handheld camera fitted with a special prismatic lens, which allowed him to point the camera in one direction while taking the photograph at a ninety-degree angle. This seminal image of a street beggar was published in 1917 as a gravure in Stieglitz’s magazine Camera Work and immediately became an icon of the new American photography, which integrated the objectivity of social documentation with the boldly simplified forms of modernism. เป็นการแอบถ่ายรุ่นแรกๆ [http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/33.43.334]

Rebecca, New York, ca. 1923 Paul Strand (American, 1890–1976) Palladium print; 7 5/8 x 9 11/16 in. (19.4 x 24.6 cm) Gift of Marilyn Walter Grounds, 1989 (1989.1135) SEE COMPLETE RECORD . This exceptionally open, intimate portrait of Rebecca Strand is one of more than a hundred that Paul Strand made of his wife between 1920 and 1932. The series was so strongly influenced by Alfred Stieglitz's celebrated extended portrait of his wife, Georgia O'Keeffe, that Strand's parallel project, pursued in close contact with his friend and mentor, may be considered an implicit act of homage. Strand's long artistic apprenticeship to Stieglitz, begun through visits to Stieglitz's gallery in 1913, came to an end with the suite of portraits he took of Rebecca in 1922–23. Whereas his earlier attempts appear strained because their long exposures required a headrest—the "iron virgin" of the studio practice—in 1922 Strand photographed his wife in bed. The removal of the former constraint and the new, supine position allowed Strand to reject the upright format of traditional portraiture and to frame boldly, solely to the dictates of his desire. The artist's freedom and his model's relaxation, intensified by their deep emotional bond, resulted in a portrait of extraordinary sensitivity and immediacy—a fresh but assured response to svelte formal elegance. [http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/1989.1135]

Rebecca, New York, ca. 1923
Paul Strand (American, 1890–1976)
Palladium print; 7 5/8 x 9 11/16 in. (19.4 x 24.6 cm) source: http://www.metmuseum.org

รูปนี้ Strand ได้รับอิทธิพลจากภาพของ Steiglitz ที่ถ่ายภาพภรรยา แต่ภาพของ Strand จะดูใกล้ชิดมากกว่า ท่าโพสจะอยู่ในท่านอนซึ่งแบบจะรู้สึกผ่อนคลายกว่านั่งเพราะถ่ายในที่แสงน้อยจึงต้องใข้เปิดหน้ากล้องนาน

References

[1] http://www.iphf.org/hall-of-fame/paul-strand/

[2] http://www.artnet.com/Magazine/features/schjeldahl/schjeldahl4-3-98.asp

[3] http://astrochicksphotodiary.blogspot.com/2009/07/essaypaul-strand.html

 

 

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